Previous


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This page is an archive of past activities, events, and projects undertaken by John Harvey, either independently or in the context of the a eye(aɪ)–ear(ɪə(r)) group and the School of Art, Aberystwyth.

Further news about, and communications by, John Harvey can also be found on Twitter (@johnharveyaber), his personal FacebookDiary, and Blog and pages of this website.


2016

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Daffyd Roberts and John Harvey will be holding an open-studio event at the School of Art to coincide with Aberystwyth University’s Open Day on November 12, 2016.


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John Harvey will be presenting his paper ‘Image and Inscription: Sonification as an interpretive Methodology in biblical, textual, and visual studies’ at the Transmedia Musics conference, Leicester University, UK, on November 18, 2016.


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John Harvey was speaking at the Serpentine Gallery/Museum of Everything symposium on the Hilma af Klint: Painting the Unseen exhibition. The event was held at the College of Psychic Studies, London, UK, April 27, 2016.


2015

John Harvey & Sandra Sagan, Live Art: Dialogues3: Strictly No Admittance

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John Harvey will be making a sonic response to Sandra Sagan’s installation Suspension at the School of Art, Aberystwyth University, UK, October 1, 2015.


John Harvey,The Bible in Translation: Image & Inscription

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The project coverts text into sounds and, in so doing, moves sections of two books from one part of the National Library of Wales to another. The texts, based on the first clause of the Second Commandment (Exodus 20.4), are taken from a Welsh and an English translation of bibles held in the Library’s manuscripts collection. The verses are transformed in two ways. Through: first, engraving — the sound of which is recorded and modulated through synthesizers; and, secondly, speech — the sound of which is recorded and manipulated on DJ decks and by filters.

At this unique 24-hour open studio session, held at the Drwm, the National Library of Wales, 24-25 September, visitors will be able to see John in the act of composing a sound artwork entitled Image & Inscription, which fuses these sources. The final outcome will be transferred to vinyl and CD, and deposited in the National Screen and Sound Archive of Wales, at the Library. The event is made possible with funding from the Arts Council of Wales.

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John Harvey, The Floating Bible: Miracle of the Risen Word

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A 57-track digital album, in either FLAC or mp3 formats, of the sound work — currently audible in ‘The Bible in Translation’ exhibition’ (School of Art Gallery, Aberystwyth University) — is available for £7 at: johnharvey.org.uk/floatingbible. The album was made possible with funding from the Arts Council of Wales.

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John Harvey, R R B V E Ǝ T N Ƨ O A

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In 2003, a wax cylinder containing a unique recording of a short speech by Evan Roberts, the charismatic figurehead of the Welsh religious revival of 1904-5, was deposited at the National Screen and Sound Archive of Wales, Aberystwyth. The cylinder had been broken into eleven extant pieces. After a painstaking restoration by an American dentist, it was able to be played during the centenary of the revival. Against the insistent noise of surface clicks and crackles and the rhythm of the stylus as it ploughs through the spinning furrows, the febrile voices of Roberts and a small choir of male singers are discernable. A digitized version of the recording was prepared by a sound studio in Pasadena, California and the British Library, London.

R R B V E Ǝ T N Ƨ O A is a sonic art intervention into, and engagement with, this sound document. The work (divided into eleven pieces) further extends the process by which Roberts’ voice has been subjected to audio recording and playback technologies. The wax cylinder’s sound is re-recorded, recomposed, rearticulated, sampled, transcribed, and accompanied using digital and analogue processors in a performance context. In this way, the audio material is fractured once again. The project is a unique collaboration between The National Screen and Sound Archive of Wales and the School of Art, Aberystwyth University.

A CD recording of the suite will be released by John Harvey and the National Screen and Sound Archive on Sain Records in March 2015. The album was made possible with funding from the Arts Council of Wales.

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John Harvey, The Pictorial Bible III & The Aural Bible II: the Bible in Translation

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The Pictorial Bible series explores ways in which biblical texts can be visualized without recourse to figuration or illustration, within a non-iconic framework of religious art. The series represents a coming together of two faculties (believing and seeing); two cultures (the bible and visuality); and two disciplines (biblical studies and art practice). Within the network of these interactions, the works are concerned with visualizing biblical texts with reference to a tradition espoused by Judaism and aniconic sensibilities within Christianity that is predicated upon the illegitimacy of pictorializing spiritual concepts and scriptural stories and events.

 The Bible in Translation is the third project in The Pictorial Bible series (following Settings of the Psalms (2000) and Seal up the Vision and Prophecy (2007)), and the second project in The Aural Bible series (following R R B V E Ǝ T N Ƨ O A (2015)). The exhibition investigates ways in which texts from, commentaries upon, and cultural articulations of, the Judaeo-Christian bible can be transformed into visual and sonic images. The printed, spoken, and heard word is subjected to a hermeneutical process that deploys systems of codification, excision, and redaction, and techniques of collage, superimposition, and abstraction. By these means, the source material yields significances, connections, and resonances that are not ordinarily evident.

 School of Art Gallery, Aberystwyth University, 16 February – 20 March 2015. The exhibition was made possible with funding from the Arts Council of Wales.

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 2014

Making a Noise About the School of Art 2: Sculpture Musicale

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On 28 October 2014, fine art and art history students on ‘Art/Sound’ (an art history module run by the School of Art, Aberystwyth University) collectively endeavoured to realise Marcel Duchamp’s (1887-1968) Sculpture Musicale (1913). His only instructions/descriptions were: ‘Sounds lasting and leaving from different places and forming a sounding sculpture that lasts’. Accordingly, eight amplifiers and oscillator devices were situated in different parts of the School and turned on simultaneously and very loudly for over half an hour. Students were able to adjust the sound parameters of the devices — and so change the character of the soundscape throughout the proceedings — and to experience the ‘invisible architecture’ of sound superimposed upon the physical architecture and acoustic properties of the building’s interior. Furthermore, the project gave art history students a rare opportunity to not only ‘observe’ but also to reconstruct an artwork.


 Making a Noise About the School of Art 1: Circuit Bending Demonstration

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On the 18 October 2014, as part of Aberystwyth University’s Open day provision, Professor John Harvey demonstrated the technique of circuit bending. Using battery operated audio devices, such as a radio, tape recorder, and CD-player, he generated a range of electrical noises not normally associated with the devices. The outputs were then passed through a series of sophisticated synthesizer filters and modifiers to create a soundscape fusion of lo-fi and hi-fi sound.

The School of Art is presently introducing art historical perspectives on sound as well as practice-based elements to enable students to cross the border between visual art and sound art. ‘Making a Noise About the School of Art’ is series of performance/demonstration events that take place in and around the Edward Davies Building as an adjunct to this strand of the School’s curriculum.


Noises from the Archive

Noises from the Archive

In October 2014, Professor John Harvey begins a collaborative project with the National Screen and Sound Archive of Wales, based at the National Library of Wales, Aberystwyth.

In September 2013, the School of Art, Aberystwyth University convened an international conference entitled ‘The Noises of Art: Audiovisuology in Practice, Theory, and History’. The event was organized with the cooperation of The Courtauld Institute of Art, London and Aberystwyth Arts Centre. The conference brought together sound-art practitioners, sound-art historians, art historians, and theoreticians from the UK, Europe, Australia, the United States, and South America. The NSSAW approached Professor Harvey (the conference convenor) to express an interest in participating in future conferences and developing, in tandem, a sound-art scheme, which this present project initiates. On completion, the project will better able sound artists, sound historians, and art historians of sound to explore the Archive with a view developing and examining artworks based upon its content. To this end, Professor Harvey is undertaking a scoping exercise to determine the range, nature, and condition of recordings that might be used in a creative and critical engagement.


Passing Shots: Goodbye to the CSVCR and John Harvey websites

From the August 1, 2014, the Centre for Studies in the Visual Culture of Religion and the old John Harvey websites will be closed down. This follows the dissolution of the Centre in June of this year as John retires from its directorship in order to focus on research in sound-art practice, theory, and history. The contents of both sites have been transferred to this latest version of John Harvey.

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Sound Teaching 1: Art/Sound

Art/Sound: Practice, Theory & History 1800-2010 will be launched at the School of Art, Aberystwyth University in September 2014. The module, taught by Professor John Harvey, will be available for second and third year students. It provides a historical overview of this prolific, varied, and ground-breaking period in the coming together, exchange, and mutual influence of visual art and sound-based practices. While the curriculum surveys a broad span of time, its focus is upon the period from modernity to the present day.

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Sounding Out 4: Aberystwyth University

On the January 24, 2014, Professor John Harvey presented his paper entitled ‘”The Noise of His Voice” (Job 37.2): Re-articulations of the Evan Roberts Wax Cylinder’ at the Voice & Something Else conference held at Aberystwyth University. The paper addressed R B V E Ǝ T N Ƨ O A E V A N R O B E R T S, his suite of counterfactual reconstructions of a unique, shattered and subsequently repaired wax-cylinder recording of the voices of the Welsh revivalist Evan Roberts (1878-1951) and a small, male-voice choir. The sonic material, derived from a digital copy of the original recording, comprises the sound of speaking and singing and (‘something else’) the noise of the technology itself: the surface defects, cracks, and static on the cylinder’s surface, together with the sound produced by drawing the cylinder’s fragments.

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2013

The Noises of Art: Audiovisual Practice in History, Theory and Culture

A conference will be convened by the School of Art, Aberystwyth University in collaboration with The Courtauld Institute of Art, London, and Aberystwyth Arts Centre on September 4-6, 2013. The Noises of Art addresses what is arguably the most prolific, varied, and groundbreaking period in the coming together, exchange, and mutual influence of visual art and sound-based practices (such as music and the spoken word). It aims to explore (principally) the visual artist’s engagement with sound, noise, music, and text while at the same time recognizing that there is a traffic of musicians, sound artists, and text artists moving in the opposite direction, who aspire to cultivate visual analogues for their work. Thus, the conference is situated at the intersection of several movements that are converging upon a point of visual-audio synthesis and exchange.

In general, although not exclusively, the forum will provide and the opportunity to:

  • draw together visual artists and text-based artists who also use sound as a mode of creative production as well as musicians and sound- or noise-based artists who also use images (static or kinetic) as a mode of creative production;
  • discuss, describe, exemplify, and present individual and collaborative practice;
  • examine the commonalities, distinctives, and relationship of image, sound, and aural text in terms of their essence, methodologies, technologies, theories, aesthetics, historical trajectories, and modes of discourse;
  • explore audio-visual practice from the perspective of cognitive, perceptual, and psychological studies.

The conference will be held over three days and include:

  • presentations of academic papers by two keynote speakers, contributing scholars, and practitioners representing the fields of visual art, sound art, music, and sound-directed text, archiving, education, psychology, and medicine;
  • the performance and presentation of works and events representing sound art, video music, spoken and sung text, and their integrations; performances will take place in public spaces and gallery areas at Aberystwyth Arts Centre, the School of Art, the National Library of Wales, and Ceredigion Museum;
  • workshops and master-classes for university creative-arts students, local schools, and the public, run by academic staff in collaboration with PhD Creative Art students. These would provide an opportunity for participants to participate in practical demonstrations and discussion.

 

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Conference website and FaceBook


Speaking Out 3: The Courtauld Institute of Art, London 

On May 30, 2013, Professor John Harvey gave a paper entitled ‘Quiet Bell: Seeing Silence in Millet’s The Angelus’ at The Listening Art Historian series of symposia organized by The Courtauld Institute of Art, London. The presentation included a conjectural, acoustic representation of the painting in response to the question: ‘What might The Angelus sound like?’

This was his second recent engagement with the Institute. In November 2012, he was a keynote speaker at the ‘Revival, Utopia, Memory, and Identity’ conference, where he presented ‘The Retrieval of Revival: Recollecting and Revising the Evan Roberts Wax Cylinder’. The paper was derived from his R R B V E Ǝ T N Ƨ O A E V A N R O B E R T sound-art suite of works, a CD recording of which will be released by the National Library of Wales later on this year.

Professor Harvey has initiated a collaborative partnership between the School of Art and the Courtauld Institute to undertake pioneering research into the relationship between sound and art history and of sound and art practice. Their next project is an international conference entitled The Noises of Art: Audiovisual Practice in History, Theory and Culture which will be convened by the School of Art, The Courtauld Institute, and Aberystwyth Arts Centre on September 4-6, this year:

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Sound recording of The Acoustic ‘Angelus’ (2013).


2012

Speaking Out 2: The Courtauld Institute of Art, London

On the November 23-4, 2012, Professor John Harvey was a keynote speaker at the Revival: Memory, Utopia, and Identity conference organised by the Courtauld Institute of Art, London. He presented a paper entitled ‘The Retrieval of Revival: Recollecting and Revising the Evan Roberts Wax Cylinder’. In 2003, a unique but severely damaged wax-cylinder recording of Evan Roberts (1878–1951), the charismatic figurehead of the Welsh religious revival of 1904-5, was discovered. The paper examined the making, restoration, and afterlife of the cylinder and its status as an index to the identity of both the revivalist and his cause. The cylinder was discussed in the context of early sound-recording processes, technology and modernity, metaphors of ruin and fracture, Roberts’ preaching, and the promotion of the religious idealism. John also explored how sound-art practice can serve as a medium and process of intrusion, interpretation, and historical inquiry.

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Speaking Out 1: University of Oxford

On the November 6, 2012, Professor John Harvey delivered a paper at the Oxford Centre for Christianity and Culture, Regent’s Park College, Oxford University. The lecture dealt with the relationship between the Spiritualist ‘apparitions’ and modernist apparatus. He argued that the western ‘image’ of disincarnate spirits produced since the 1860s has been shaped significantly by the devices used to discern and document them. The study focuses upon the contribution that the camera and audio recorder has made to both the fabrication of spirit entities and endeavours to contact the dead.

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Live Art: Dialogues2

Live Art is a generic term that describes acts of individual or collaborative, innovative and explorative, performance practice. It can be undertaken in relation to one or more art forms. Dialogues is a series of experimental and experiential exchanges between the visual and audible arts. The discourse is through improvisation: a free-style creative act that exists in the moment, in the instincts and intuitions of the individual, and in the participants’ reciprocal response to each other’s activities. (It may, but need not have, an audience.) On this occasion, the conversation is through the mediums of drawing and sounding (that is, the act of perceiving and emitting, aurally). The exchange takes place within the ‘laboratory’ of the School of Art’s Project Room. It provides a controlled environment in which the collaborators can learn, invent, test concepts, devices, and methods, make trial of different models of practice, and record ideas. Two determinations govern the collaboration: action and consideration; (to make in order to understand and to understand what has been made).

Dialogues2 responds to several visual and aural observations arising from the first workshop. First, that the sound produced by the friction and movement of a pencil or stick of charcoal across the paper support is an overlooked (underheard) bi-product of the act of drawing: a sonic trace that is ordinarily ephemeral and undetermined. One of the aims of the second workshop is to concentrate on, and foreground, the sound of drawing and its permutations (sound as drawing, drawing with sound, and the drawing of sound), and to give it permanence through audio recording. The sound of drawings made by one practitioner will be captured by microphonic pencils (‘pencrophones’) and upon an ‘electro-acoustic drawing board’, passed through a series of analogue and digital sound filters (which will mutate, loop, and sustain the source) manipulated by another practitioner, and, thereafter, amplified. In so doing, visual drawing is conceived as, also, an aural and performative activity engaged by two participants. Secondly, the workshop examines the observation that the sound of drawing possesses an indeterminate pitch-melody which can be mapped onto a musical scale. The participants will deploy exercises that test the relationship between the pencil (here, conceived as a musical instrument), sound drawing, and free-form music, in cooperation with other types of musical instrumentation (in this context, a hybrid electric guitar).

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Sound recordings of Live Art: Dialogues2.


2011

R B V E Ǝ T N Ƨ O A E V A N R O B E R T S: a b o r t  n e r v e s

In 2003, a wax cylinder containing a unique recording of a short speech by Evan Roberts, the charismatic figurehead of the Welsh religious revival of 1904-5, was deposited at the National Screen and Sound Archive of Wales, Aberystwyth. The cylinder had been broken into eleven extant pieces. After a painstaking restoration by an American dentist, it was able to be played during the centenary of the revival. Against the insistent noise of surface clicks and crackles and the rhythm of the stylus as it ploughs through the spinning furrows, the febrile voices of Roberts and a small choir of male singers are discernable. A digitized version of the recording was prepared by a sound studio in Pasadena, California and the British Library, London.

R R B V E Ǝ T N Ƨ O A is a sonic art intervention into, and engagement with, this sound document. The work (divided into 12 pieces) further extends the process by which Roberts’ voice has been subjected to audio recording and playback technologies. The wax cylinder’s sound is re-recorded, recomposed, rearticulated, sampled, transcribed, and accompanied using digital and analogue processors in a performance context. In this way, the audio material is fractured once again. The project is a unique collaboration between The National Screen and Sound Archive of Wales and the School of Art, Aberystwyth University, and the first release in John Harvey’s The Aural Bible series sound works.

On the November 16, 2011, at the National Library of Wales, Aberystwyth, John Harvey presented a lecture on the project and performed the first of the 12 pieces, entitled ‘Abort Nerves’. The remaining 11 recordings will be made at chapels and churches in Wales and England where Roberts visited and preached during the revival. Afterwards, these recordings will be transferred to new wax cylinders, using a contemporary version of the phonograph, and deposited, along with digital versions of the pieces, in the National Screen and Sound Archives.

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2011

Energy Gift Exchange Day 

On the November 17, 2011, John Harvey participated in an ‘Energy Gift Exchange Day’. The event was a feature of Maria Hayes’ Shedding Skins exhibition, at the School of Art Galleries, Aberystwyth University. The exhibition is the Portfolio Element of her PhD Fine Art studies. The collaboration involved John improvising on electric guitar and effects while being drawn by Maria using a combination of manual dexterity and technological devices.

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Video recordings of Maria Hayes and John Harvey, Energy Gift Exchange Day: Day 11 (2011): Part 2, Part 4.


Live Art: Dialogues

On October 14-15, 2011, Adam Blackburn (who has just completed his MA in Fine Art) and Professor John Harvey built a test bed in order to examine some possible relationships between drawing and sound production. This experimental platform was part of the School’s endeavour to develop intermedial studies between visual art and other creative disciplines. The event was neither a public performance nor a concert. Rather, it was a two-day mutually-educative session in which the collaborators were both the teacher and the learner.

Live Art is a generic term that describes acts of individual or collaborative, innovative and explorative, performance practice. It can be undertaken in relation to one or more art forms. Dialogues is the second in a series of experimental and experiential exchanges between the visual and audible arts. The discourse is through improvisation: a free-style creative act that exists in the moment, in the instincts and intuitions of the individual, and in the participants’ reciprocal response to each other’s activities.  (It may, but need not have, an audience.) On this occasion, the conversation was through the mediums of drawing and sounding (that is, the act of perceiving and emitting, aurally). The exchange took place within the ‘laboratory’ of the School of Art’s Project Room. It provided a controlled environment in which the collaborators could learn, invent, test concepts, device . s, and methods, make trial of different models of practice, and record ideas. Two determinations governed the collaboration: action and consideration; (to make in order to understand and to understand what has been made).

Both drawing and sounding were conducted in an abstract mode. This implies that the physical means and language of the art form was not directed towards (in respect to the former) the representation of the visible world and (in respect to the latter) melodic structure and composition. The conscious exclusion of these otherwise legitimate concerns enabled the participants to concentrate on the art forms’ formal and shared elements (either actual or metaphorical). For example: shape, line, pattern, texture, rhythm, pulse, tonality, atonality, pitch, contrast, dynamics, scale, size,  simplicity, complexity, variation, repetition, layering, relation, sequence, proportion,  wholeness, starting, stopping, resolution, duration, speed, vibration, movement, gesture, space, silence, noise, cacophony, indeterminacy, and distortion.

The collaboration was, for all intents and purposes, a duet. (And, as in Renaissance music, the duet was a teaching tool performed by student and teacher). While the ‘players’ performed together in the same space, they were at the same time separated by the obstinate and yet beguiling disparities between their respective mediums. Both participants are visual artists who play musical instruments. Therefore, as they sought to explore the nature and possibilities of a meaningful and productive interaction between two people and two art forms, the duo contributed a tutored and an intuitive understanding of each other’s chosen domain.

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Sound recordings of Live Art: Dialogues.


Intercessions and Vox Populi

At Bangor Cathedral, Wales, in March 2011, Professor Harvey participated in an experimental sound and visual-art work with entitled Vox Populi  by the composer Andrew Lewis (Professor and Director of the Electroacoustic Music Studios at Bangor University). John’s contribution, entitled Intercessions, comprised 64 static and kinetic images of ‘prayer words’ arranged into four sets and projected onto one of the nave walls. The words combined in a variety of chance configurations, continuously auto-generating prayer requests during the period of the installation.

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Sounding Out 3: Princeton Theological Seminary

In April 2011, Professor Harvey was a keynote speaker at the Calvinism and Culture conference held at the prestigious Princeton Theological Seminary, USA. He presented a paper on his fine-art research entitled ‘An Art of Predestination: Textual-Visual-Aural Approaches to Imaging the Bible’. The presentation included the first live performance of The Second Commandment II, an audio artefact from The Aural Bible I: Transfiguration project, based the Second Commandment of the Decalogue.

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Sound recording of The Second Commandment (2011).


2010

Sounding Out 1: Liverpool Cathedral

On the December 11, 2010, Professor John Harvey presented a paper entitled ‘The Un-“Graven Image”: Anticonic Approaches to Art’. He also performed one of the audio artefacts entitled Graven Image I from The Aural Bible I series of works, at the Contemplations of the Spiritual in Art conference at Liverpool Cathedral.

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Sound recording of Graven Image I (2010).


‘Here Everything is Still Floating’: An Exercise in Sound Drawing

‘All good ideas arrive by chance’ (Max Ernst)

During our Visiting Day on Saturday 6 March 2010, the School of Art continued its series of experimental workshops designed to explore the relationship between sound and image. The first was Concert: To Do Something in Cooperation with Another, held on the March 3. On this second occasion, Naomi Pincher (a third-year fine-art student), Reuben Knutson (Studio Tutor) and John Harvey (Professor of Art) collaborated to create an impromptu and improvisatory sound- and drawing-based installation. Here Everything is Still Floating (with acknowledgement to M E) comprised objects – including drawing- and writing-instruments – suspended in the air by balloons filled with helium. The objects delicately inscribed marks upon the screens of overhead projectors, and produced sounds when they made contact with an electrically-charged sheet of foil laid across the gallery floor. The vibrations of the air – caused by the movement of passers-by, the sound projected from loudspeakers, fans, and changes in the ambient temperature and atmospheric pressure of the exhibition space – acted upon the balloons (and the objects thereby) to create a ‘chance-chart’ of their drift, sway and swagger, pulsations, bleeps and buzzes, throughout the course of the day. The sound-based aspect of the installation consisted of live and pre-recorded audio material, digital-effects processors, and guitar work, and aimed both to stimulate further and ‘mimic’ the deft, accidental, and automatic peregrinations of these floating objects. The project exemplifies the widening concept of drawing and the development of inter-medial art practiced at the School.

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Sound recording of The Family Bible Floats Through the Living Room (2010).


Concert: to Do Something in Cooperation with Another (Improvisations in Image & Sound)

‘Don’t You Wonder Sometimes,‘bout Sound and Vision’ (David Bowie)

On March 3, 2010, Maria Hayes and Professor John Harvey initiated the first in a series of interdisciplinary collaborations involving image- and sound-making, and student and teacher.

Maria is an artist, film-maker, and educator whose work is concerned with the human form, landscape, music, and movement. She is currently studying for a PhD in Fine Art at the School of Art under John’s supervision. Professor Harvey is an art practitioner and an art historian with a particular interest in the visual culture of religion. Recently, both have – independently and in very different ways – interacted with music and sound: Maria produced a series of illustrations in response to the Martin Pyne’s alternative-jazz album 7 Pictures (2010); John, for his part, had experimented with sound-based articulations of biblical texts. As a result, they felt ready, and that this was an opportune time, to extend and apply their respective endeavours to bridge the medial divide.

In Concert: To Do Something in Cooperation with Another, student and tutor worked together to combine image making with sound making, and visual and audio technologies, during a day of improvisations. They attempted to do something in order to see what will happen. There were no presuppositions about the outcome. The only certainty was the principle of uncertainty. Nevertheless, the artists embarked upon the occasion with a determination to: explore new possibilities; learn from one another; interpret and respond to each other’s efforts; be fearless of failure and surprised by the unexpected; live in the moment; and address the process rather than the product (in other words, to concentrate on the journey rather than the destination).

Concert was not a performance; it was not undertaken for an audience principally but, rather, for the participants. However, students, staff, and members of the public were welcome to visit the gallery throughout the day in order to see and hear the work in progress. The spectators encountered an example of practice-based-research-in-action: a playful yet critical investigation of what takes place when two distinct modes of creativity are juxtaposed. Maria and John anticipated moments of convergence and reciprocity, illumination and reconciliation; as well as periods of floundering, befuddlement, arbitrariness, and disintegration; and times of recovery and resolution too. In these respects, their creative experience resonated with that of every artist. Maria worked with a sophisticated projection system which facilitated performative drawing and painting. John’s tools were an electric guitar and electronic, sound-modifying devices. The collaboration took place in the single gallery at the School of Art, Aberystwyth University.

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Video recording of Improvisation No. 1 (2010)


2009

Sounding Out 1: University of Calgary

In September 2009, Professor John Harvey was Visiting Artist & Scholar at the Department of Fine Art, University of Calgary, Canada. There he presented a paper entitled ‘An Anti-Icon: A Protestant Art Now’ based on his practice-based research on art and the Bible. He also performed, for the first time, sections from The Second Commandment I (2009) – an audio-artefact derived from Exodus 20.4. The sound artwork forms part of his current research projects The Aural Bible I and The Pictorial Bible III: TransfigurationsThe Second Commandment I is, what John describes as, a ‘non-image’ or ‘anti-icon’, comprising spoken biblical texts, electric-guitar compositions, and electronic devices. John also taught on the department’s MFA course. One of the School of Art’s own PhD Fine Art students, Susan Fraser-Hughes, is presently undertaking the program by distance-learning with the assistance of Professor Eric Cameron (External Co-Supervisor at the University of Calgary).

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Sound recording of The Second Commandment (2009)