August 11, 2014

I bought this book from Amazon last year for about £40. Obviously, it has proved to be a worthy investment. I’ll hang onto it for a more few years, then sell it, and buy another house with the proceedings. It’s a very good book, but not that good:

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For the first hour of the morning, I established my timetable of appointments for the week, my agenda for the day, and dispatched emails. On, then, with the Art/Sound module lectures (with J S Bach’s Art of the Fugue and Keith Jarrett’s Hymns and Spheres playing in the background). This week I’m focusing on the development of Musique Concrète in relation to Synthetic Cubism. I’ve not dealt with the latter, other than in passing, since I wrote my undergraduate art history dissertation in 1981. (Few things we do are so self-contained as to exert no influence on other things we do later.) That dissertation remains the most painful and effortful piece of research that I’ve ever undertaken. But it has also among my most rewarding endeavours — developing my skills as a writer, passion for art history, and mental agility:

In tandem with lecture writing, I began processing files for Matt. 20.10 of ‘The Floating Bible: Miracle of the Risen Word (Recto)‘ sound piece:

During my lunch hour, I prepared photographs of pedals and other devices, now surplus to requirement, for sale on eBay:

I returned to the Art/Sound lecture in the afternoon, fielding emails and processing sound files along the way. Every topic I touch upon yields more directions and connections than I can possibly accommodate within a lecture. This is a rich vein. But I can’t afford to spend too long on any one thing. Perhaps I shall revisit these ideas in the context of an authored book in the near future:

An evening eBaying. It’s the only occasion on which I countenance plagiarism. I’m more than happy to lift the copywrite that companies flaunt to sell their little boxes with knobs on. Which is not to say that their text doesn’t require a little copyediting in order to make it grammatical, syntactical, and clear.

At last, we have a door and frame to our new bathroom:

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